Second Story Deck Ideas

Second Story Deck Ideas

During my recent trip to Cincinnati to visit some of our screen customers, I noticed many people used the area under their 2nd story back deck to install screens. The space was perfect for mounting screens underneath and sealing off the patio area. Two of the three residences I visited had this type of setup for their retractable screen area. The first home I visited, the Blower’s, had the screens installed under their back 2nd story deck to seal off a nice patio area that was a section of their outdoor living space; the other section included an outdoor fireplace and open lounge area. But, when they need an enclosed area with protection from bugs in the evening, they take their company into the screened-in area. They have a river located about 150 feet from the back of their home and the bugs can be quite obnoxious, so they got two Panorama™ screens and three PanoramaLite™ screens to fit their application. Both products they ordered manual and say it seals off their area totally from bugs. The magnets installed on the cement allow the screens to latch when they are pulled down and the “fuzzy” strip on the bottom of the pull-down cover the bottom opening, both making sure no bugs enter the patio area. The product selection was decided on based upon their existing openings and size requirements. The two far openings are both Panorama™ because those are the largest openings and PanoramaLite™ doesn’t reach that far in its span because it is a smaller, lighter option. The three other smaller openings were easily fitted with PanoramaLite™ units, Panorama™’s little sister. Panorama spans up to 13’ tall and 24’ wide and PanoramaLite spans up to 9’ tall and 10’ wide. They each come with a variety of screen choices, some specifically for keeping tiny bugs out and some are heavy-duty to protect against pet wear. Each screen’s pull-down bar has a little metal eyelet for using the hook tool to pull the screens down manually. They glide smoothly and were easy for Tami to move up and down. The Blower’s like their area for company hanging out in the evenings after golfing, dinnertime with friends and family, and winding down with Bunker, their sweet little dog that still has his unhindered view of the outdoors. When I asked Steve what he thought about the screens he said, “We love to be outdoors, this just makes it so much more functional.” The bugs were the main reason they looked into retractable screens, but their screens also provide a cooler shaded area during the day when the sun hits the back of the house. The screens allowed them to utilize their living space and get some great use out of their outdoor area. Retractability lengthens the life of the screen and creates a breathable, flexible space. Pulling Down Screens Under her 2nd Story Back Deck Share100
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Second Story Deck Ideas

U.S. Government’s Forest Projects Laboratory System, developed by researchers at the U.S. government’s Forest Products Laboratory, will keep a deck from prying loose—and it will help prevent rot. Inspecting your own deck To check the attachment between a house and a deck, go beneath it and look at the main beam: “If you don’t see bolts and flashing, it’s because they’re not there,” says Tom Carty, the building director for Peachtree City, Georgia. Adding lag bolts may make the connection more secure, but often either the beam or the house has begun to rot. Carty suggests sticking a pocketknife into the beam and the wall; if the blade penetrates easily, the wood is rotting and the entire deck-to-house-joint may need rebuilding. If bolts are in place but a gap at the joint appears, it could be a sign they are working loose—or were never attached to anything structural in the first place.
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Second Story Deck Ideas

4 × Tom Silva’s System Tom Silva’s System This system, developed by researchers at the U.S. government’s Forest Products Laboratory, will keep a deck from prying loose—and it will help prevent rot. Adding a deck to a house in Lexington, Massachusetts, This Old House contractor Tom Silva pays particular attention to the beam that connects the deck to the house and carries all the supporting joists. “It’s where 99 percent of mistakes are made,” he says. Because a beam pressed tight against a house can trap moisture and encourage rot, Tom creates a gap for air with spacers shaped to fit the recessed foundation of the house. He cuts the spacers from scraps of pressure-treated wood, nails them on and then drills two holes through each spacer and the beam, one hole near the top edge, another at the bottom. Tom and his nephew Charlie Silva jockey the beam into position. Aiming through the top holes previously made, they drill into the house’s wooden sill and screw in lag bolts. Through the lower holes, they install masonry anchor bolts into the concrete foundation. For flashing, Tom uses an adhesive-backed flexible membrane made of polyethylene film and rubberized asphalt. Tom prefers it to metal flashing because its sticky nature makes a watertight seal around bolts that penetrate the surface. Since the material could degrade in ultraviolet light, however, he makes sure to cover it with siding and decking. To prevent rot, Tom constructs the entire deck frame from pressure-treated wood. This wood is usually loaded with arsenic and chromium as preservatives, but he works with a look-alike product treated with a safer preservative, A.C.Q. For the decking, Tom switches to cedar or redwood because he likes the look.
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Second Story Deck Ideas

Tom Silva’s System This system, developed by researchers at the U.S. government’s Forest Products Laboratory, will keep a deck from prying loose—and it will help prevent rot. Adding a deck to a house in Lexington, Massachusetts, This Old House contractor Tom Silva pays particular attention to the beam that connects the deck to the house and carries all the supporting joists. “It’s where 99 percent of mistakes are made,” he says. Because a beam pressed tight against a house can trap moisture and encourage rot, Tom creates a gap for air with spacers shaped to fit the recessed foundation of the house. He cuts the spacers from scraps of pressure-treated wood, nails them on and then drills two holes through each spacer and the beam, one hole near the top edge, another at the bottom. Tom and his nephew Charlie Silva jockey the beam into position. Aiming through the top holes previously made, they drill into the house’s wooden sill and screw in lag bolts. Through the lower holes, they install masonry anchor bolts into the concrete foundation. For flashing, Tom uses an adhesive-backed flexible membrane made of polyethylene film and rubberized asphalt. Tom prefers it to metal flashing because its sticky nature makes a watertight seal around bolts that penetrate the surface. Since the material could degrade in ultraviolet light, however, he makes sure to cover it with siding and decking. To prevent rot, Tom constructs the entire deck frame from pressure-treated wood. This wood is usually loaded with arsenic and chromium as preservatives, but he works with a look-alike product treated with a safer preservative, A.C.Q. For the decking, Tom switches to cedar or redwood because he likes the look.
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Second Story Deck Ideas

The simplest, and in many cases most affordable, deck location is directly adjacent to a home on a relatively flat portion of land. This platform style of deck sits low to the ground, allowing for easy access. One thing to focus on with this deck location is to ensure that all deck materials are treated for direct ground exposure to prevent rot and decay.
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Second Story Deck Ideas

Two-story decks make the most sense for locations with easy access to the second story of a home. The bottom portion of the deck generally allows for first-floor entry, and is connected to a top section, which allows for second-floor entry.
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Second Story Deck Ideas

Adding a deck to a house in Lexington, Massachusetts, This Old House contractor Tom Silva pays particular attention to the beam that connects the deck to the house and carries all the supporting joists. “It’s where 99 percent of mistakes are made,” he says. Because a beam pressed tight against a house can trap moisture and encourage rot, Tom creates a gap for air with spacers shaped to fit the recessed foundation of the house. He cuts the spacers from scraps of pressure-treated wood, nails them on and then drills two holes through each spacer and the beam, one hole near the top edge, another at the bottom. Tom and his nephew Charlie Silva jockey the beam into position. Aiming through the top holes previously made, they drill into the house’s wooden sill and screw in lag bolts. Through the lower holes, they install masonry anchor bolts into the concrete foundation. For flashing, Tom uses an adhesive-backed flexible membrane made of polyethylene film and rubberized asphalt. Tom prefers it to metal flashing because its sticky nature makes a watertight seal around bolts that penetrate the surface. Since the material could degrade in ultraviolet light, however, he makes sure to cover it with siding and decking. To prevent rot, Tom constructs the entire deck frame from pressure-treated wood. This wood is usually loaded with arsenic and chromium as preservatives, but he works with a look-alike product treated with a safer preservative, A.C.Q. For the decking, Tom switches to cedar or redwood because he likes the look.

Second Story Deck Ideas

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